Where do your eggs come from?

So, do your organic eggs come from here?

Or from here?

Yes, both of those are photos of organic egg-producing farms.  Kind of scary, isn’t it? I was happy to find this scorecard from the Cornocopia Institute which rates different farms from “exemplary-beyond organic” on down to “ethically deficient.”  I haven’t gone to figure out where the ones I can get from my Whole Foods rate on the egg-o-meter…

Sigh.  Organic transparency. When farm owners say things like “The push for continually expanding outdoor access … needs to stop.” Of course. God forbid the “cage free” and “free range” markings on the cartons should actually mean something. (And one should note, in that second picture, the hens are technically “cage-free”…)

This kind of thing puts me off omelettes for a while…

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Posted on October 8, 2010, in articles, responsible shopping and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. Mine come from the backyard. Well actually, they’re in the garden now. So yummy! Never have to worry about a recall.

  2. That’s awesome! We’re not quite ready for our own chickens yet, but someday…

    I was actually happy to discover today at Whole Foods that my own blog post helped me pick out eggs! One of the brands I often buy is rated a “3” on Cornocopia’s 1-5 scale–not fabulous, but not bad either.

  3. Hmmm, great link. When I run out of eggs, the one I buy scores a 1. I’ve had a friend visit it, though, and said it was great, with lots of outdoor access for the hens. Still, very helpful I think for the bigger farm operations.

  4. At least around here a lot of our farmers markets have folks who sell eggs from their own tiny flocks of chickens who roam the yard.
    One problem with truly free range chickens is that you have to round them up a night into a secure place or the predators get them. sometimes that even happens in the daytime.
    Our local farmer says, incidentally, that if chickens dont go our as babies they have no desire to do so later, want to stay in, so “free range” means what///

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