Insect-Repelling Plants

This is interesting…

INSECT PEST REPELLING PLANT
Ants pennyroyal, spearmint, southernwood, tansy
Aphids garlic, chives and other alliums, coriander, anise, nasturtium and petunia around fruit trees
Borer garlic, onion, tansy
Cabbage moth mint, hyssop, rosemary, southernwood, thyme, sage, wormwood, celery, catnip, nasturtium
Colorado potato beetle green beans, horseradish, dead nettle, flax, catnip, coriander, tansy, nasturtium
Cucumber beetle tansy, radish
Cutworm tansy
Flea beetle wormwood, mint, catnip, interplant cole crops with tomato
Japanese beetle garlic, larkspur, tansy, rue, white geranium
Leafhopper petunia, geranium
Mexican bean beetle marigold, potato, rosemary, savory, petunia
Mites onion, garlic, chives
Nematodes marigold, salvia, dahlia, calendula, asparagus
Rose chafer geranium, petunia, onion
Slug prostrate rosemary, wormwood
Squash bug tansy, nasturtium, catnip
Tomato hornworm borage, marigold, opal basal
Whitefly nasturtium, marigold

Given what I’ve planted, I should perhaps find some tansy.   Seems to work for borer, squash bug, AND cucumber beetle.  Assuming this site (www.thriftyfun.com/tf29648744.tip.html) is correct…

Then again, on another site, I found this:

“Annual Marigolds can be used anywhere to deter Mexican bean beetle, squash bug, thrips, tomato hornworm, and whitefly. They are also known to repel harmful root knot nematodes (soil dwelling microscopic white worms) that attack tomatoes, potatoes, roses, and strawberries. The root of the Marigold produces a chemical that kills nematodes as they enter the soil. If a whole area is infested, at the end of the season, turn the Marigolds under so the roots will decay in the soil. You can safely plant there again the following spring. Nasturtium is another annual, in this case a trailing vine, that keeps away Colorado potato bug, squash bug, and whitefly.” (www.sheridannurseries.com/gardensite/subGARDENTIP25mainframe.htm)

Which implies that the $16.99 I spent on a flat of marigolds is probably worth what I paid for it.  I may try to throw some Nasturtiums back there too, since I like them anyway and they taste yummy in salads.  I could train them up the fence, maybe…
–J

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Posted on May 6, 2009, in gardening and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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